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The Blue Arch of a Mosque in EsfahanPhoto and caption by Tandis KhodadadianPhotographed April 2013, Esfahan, Iran

The Blue Arch of a Mosque in Esfahan
Photo and caption by Tandis Khodadadian
Photographed April 2013, Esfahan, Iran

(via wildboywonder)



ejakulation:

Travel Through Africa, Pleats Please Issey Miyake

ejakulation:

Travel Through Africa, Pleats Please Issey Miyake



witchesandslippersandhoods:

Issey Miyake: East Meets West
PARADISE LOST Print designed by Tadanori Yoko-o Produced in 1976 Photographed by Noriaki Yokosuka

witchesandslippersandhoods:

Issey Miyake: East Meets West

PARADISE LOST
Print designed by Tadanori Yoko-o
Produced in 1976
Photographed by Noriaki Yokosuka



yhji:

i-D Magazine #328  //   King Krule by Alasdair McLellan

(via thvrd)



awarewolves:

swollenimages:

Today, I shot a music video for Aki Medina’s Swirl today around the streets of Manila with Zy Carreon and Iyay Verona.

I’m happy with how this shoot turned out. Manila is beautiful.

I love this set so much 



luzfosca:

Kelvingrove, Glasgow
Thanks to auspices

luzfosca:

Kelvingrove, Glasgow

Thanks to auspices



(via moshrydes)



hahamagartconnect:

PORN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY (NSFW)

Brian Steinhoff’s attempts at lessening the shock with a skin trade of floral patterns somehow doesn’t make me blush any less. Matter of fact, I debated whether or not to add NSFW to Magazine’s post. But my eyes were quick to replace grandma’s bad wallpaper for skins tones and fleshy parts. 

This creative form of discussing the banality of censorship makes me think of those late nights trying to bring in films I ought not - trying to make out bodies through the fuzz and static. What I couldn’t see was quickly replaced by my wild adolescent imagination. With form and shape still intact does Steinhoff’s series really hide anything? Or does it represent the things/images we inevitably can’t control? 

*See more images from the series Porn for the Whole Family here.





“The very meaninglessness of life forces man to create his own meaning. Children, of course, begin life with an untarnished sense of wonder, a capacity to experience total joy at something as simple as the greenness of a leaf; but as they grow older, the awareness of death and decay begins to impinge on their consciousness and subtly erode their joie de vivre, their idealism – and their assumption of immortality. As a child matures, he sees death and pain everywhere about him, and begins to lose faith in the ultimate goodness of man. But, if he’s reasonably strong – and lucky – he can emerge from this twilight of the soul into a rebirth of life’s elan. Both because of and in spite of his awareness of the meaninglessness of life, he can forge a fresh sense of purpose and affirmation. He may not recapture the same pure sense of wonder he was born with, but he can shape something far more enduring and sustaining. The most terrifying fact about the universe is not that it is hostile but that it is indifferent; but if we can come to terms with this indifference and accept the challenges of life within the boundaries of death – however mutable man may be able to make them – our existence as a species can have genuine meaning and fulfillment. However vast the darkness, we must supply our own light.”

 —Stanley Kubrick (via theromanticboheme)